Screen time in nursery

In todays society, Technology is everywhere and our children are exposed to it daily. I believe that with the correct balance of outdoor play and technology we would see the benefits of technology rather than having the stigma of it rotting our children’s minds.

In many establishments technology has been seen has a gap to fill between daily transitions for example – screen time after lunch or iPad opportunities later in the nursery day and many parents and practitioners disagree with this. I am however a professional who likes to see the benefit of offering these opportunities to children.

In recent years nursery establishments have implemented many strategies to decrease the amount of screen time there is in the settings and have written several policies about the procedure.

Offering screen time isn’t just about children sitting down and watching cartoons whilst staff tidy up or set up an area , it can be a time for children to relax after a busy morning and un wind with their peers with comfy pillows and teddies and have a recharge for the afternoon.

Many children in nursery settings are actually in from 7am to 6pm and I personally think its healthy and beneficial to offer children a 15 minute break from outdoor play and any other type of play to just sit and relax and to be honest ”switch off” from the world around them.Image result for screen time

I would love to know your thoughts on screen time ;

P.S I am not suggesting to sit children down, all day, everyday. I am merely offering a topic of discussion.

I shall leave with a quote :  “Teachers need to integrate technology seamlessly into the curriculum instead of viewing it as an add-on, an afterthought, or an event.” – Heidi-Hayes Jacobs

Twitter : @tweetmeduncan

Email: earlyyearsman@gmail.com

 

Playdough station!

So whilst in work , I have been developing our playdough station to encourage the children to be more independent and eventually become confident enough to make their own playdough.

We have used a more natural approach in terms of resources and I think it looks fantastic. Already they children were intrigued with the new set up and I am looking forward to the new term so we can see it in full glory!

Death – What do we say ?

This week in my setting, I have been asked the dreaded question that turns professionals in early years into babbling , stuttering monkeys.

” What does it mean to die ?”

At first the question had me slammed and panic bells where ringing in my ears and I felt faint. Then all of a sudden courage came forward and said ” You can do this Duncan”. Help them understand ( or try )

I sat with the individual and asked what she thought it means to die and her answer was perfect, what she said was ” when your body is tired and it stops working”.

on reflection I realised that I am rubbish at explaining what it means to die and I’m not sure if I am the right person to tell other peoples children my own interpretation of what it actually means to die.

My question is this – How do others explain this part of life? and do you actually feel comfortable talking about it to the children that you care for ?

I look forward to you views on the subject

Thanks you for reading ,

Earlyyears man

 

twitter – @tweetmeduncan