First time Blog – my experience

PLEASE NOTE THESE ARE MY PERSONAL OPINIONS!
First time blog post ! how exciting !
So for the last ten years I have had the great privilege to work in the amazing sector known as early years. During the last couple of years I have started to take more of an interest to looking into why there are not enough male role models in the early years profession however, before I discuss that point I would first like to ask the question in a more greater scheme. Instead of asking ”where are all the male role models”  we firstly should be asking ”where are all of the good quality staff?”
during my career I have came across many wonderful and amazing individuals who have went on and carried out amazing things for early years but I have also met some individuals that have seen early years as a ” get out of school quickly” kind of job or the dreaded ” I’ve baby sat for my auntie and uncle a few times and I think id like to work with children.” kind of people. yes I know that it very vague but hopefully you understand where I am coming from !
so, where should we start? When I was in high school I knew I wanted to educate children , I spent many days at my aunties nursery helping in the playroom and having a role model like her encouraged me to work in early years.
So when little sixteen year old Duncan told his guidance teacher that he wanted to work in a children’s nursery, instead of a ” WOW well done” or ”that’s amazing” I was shocked to be told that it was a job with no career path and then I was questioned to why did I want to spend my time cleaning runny noses and changing nappies when I could work at a computer all day and work nine to five and live happily ever after. sorry to burst your bubble guidance teacher but your wrong ! I’m rubbish with computers ( proof is in the blog) .
with my guidance teachers amazingly motivational chat (not!) I applied for college and got accepted thankfully and two years later became a qualified child development officer.
From qualifying in 2010 I have learned a great deal about the Scottish curriculum and local guidelines for our children in early years however, recently I have questioned the quality of the staff in early years. I personally feel that in todays society working with children in an early years establishment still gets a bit of negative feedback. I have heard 1000 times by individuals that they wanted to gain a qualification in this field due to the fact that there uncle Paul said ” your good at babysitting” or the ” I would like to work with children because my mum said I’m good with my younger siblings”
So I personally feel before we encourage more males in to the profession I firstly think we should be looking at our quality of ALL staff no matter gender , sex , race. and we should be focusing on the education side of the job as well as the care and when employing new staff or enrolling new students into courses we should be looking at them in a more holistic approach rather than what’s on their exam results or there application form. I don’t have the answers but it is something I am passionate about to change the stigma of early years from being ”glorified baby sitters” to a more educational profession.
To work in early years I personally feel  you should be a motivated individual , who can roll with the punches and take everyday by the horns. we are also slightly mad and act completely crazy for the children ( and occasionally staff ) we are comedians , musicians, police officers , artists , toilet staff , book readers and many many more. Thank you for your time reading my blog and I look forward to developing along side you readers.
Thank you ,
Duncan.
I shall leave with a quote.
“[Kids] don’t remember what you try to teach them. They remember what you are.”
― Jim Henson, It’s Not Easy Being Green: And Other Things to Consider

4 thoughts on “First time Blog – my experience

  1. I think you are on to something here! Not in the childcare profession myself but have come across the polar opposite in my own workplace. They seem to be encouraging the promotion of female staff simply to raise the numbers, not considering that their may be a better male for the job.

    Gender shouldn’t matter at all in any workplace, the quality of your work is not dictated by your reproductive organs, it is dictated by your passion for your particular field!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. In New Zealand, the number of qualified male teachers in early childhood is approximately 440. That is out of 22,000 qualified teachers, putting the percentage at around 1.8%. For every 1 male teacher, there are 64 teachers who are women. I would imagine it is very much similar in the UK.

    What that means is that there are thousands of potentially tremendous early childhood teachers that are missing out on the opportunity because of a few seen and unseen barriers. Things like men in early childhood being viewed as sexual predators, ‘cultural’ justifications for gender bias and leadership in early childhood centres/nurseries refusing to support their male staff and instead facilitating the culture of bias in the sector all contribute to men seeing a career in ECEC as undesirable.

    I see the idea of more men in ECEC and that of quality as being inextricably linked. Considering the quality we are missing out on by having so few men entering into ECEC and how many more quality teachers we could be bringing into the sector if we were able to break down those gender barriers that do exist.

    Liked by 1 person

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